ABA: About half of 2011 law grads found law work

According to new American Bar Association information, only 55 percent of law school graduates in 2011 were able to obtain full-time, permanent employment in a law job within nine months of graduation.

For years, the ABA didn’t require schools to break down their information, allowing them to get by with simply reporting that a student was employed, without divulging to what extent.

The top schools are the usual suspects: University of Virginia, Harvard, etc. But 20 schools reported less than 40 percent of graduates were able to obtain full-time, permanent law jobs.

Two of those schools are University of Detroit-Mercy Law School and the Thomas M. Cooley Law School. U-DM Law had the lowest figure in the state with only 36.84 percent of its 209 graduates able to find full time work. Cooley reported that 37.54 percent of its 999 graduates able to find jobs requiring a law degree. Cooley reported that 26.33 percent of its graduates’ employment status was unknown, an astonishingly high figure in comparison to the other schools’ reporting.

The University of Michigan had the highest rate among Michigan schools, with 75.46 percent of its graduates being able to find jobs, the 13th best nationwide.

Wayne State University Law School was a distant second with a 50.74 percent of its 203 graduates finding work, about four percent off the national average.

Michigan State University School of Law was third with a rate of 44.17 percent of 283 graduates able to find work.

That’s an awful lot of student loans in deferment.

[This post was corrected to remove a statement that Cooley’s numbers could be lower. As pointed out in the comments, the “unknown” graduates are assumed to be unemployed for the purposes of these statistics.]

One thought on “ABA: About half of 2011 law grads found law work

  1. ” That number could be even lower, as Cooley reported that 26.33 percent of its graduates’ employment status was unknown”

    This is false. 37.54% employed in full-time jobs requiring bar passage nine months after graduation assumes everyone’s employment status that was unknown was not employed in a job requiring bar passage nine months after graduation. So the real number can only be higher, not lower.

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